Dire News

Tag: orangutan

Barrow of Monkeys

by on Jun.22, 2015, under Animals, Education, Nature

What's more fun than a barrel of puppies? puppies_barrel Philosopher Milton Bradley tells us it's a Barrel of Monkeys. monkeys_nofun02 When it comes down to it, you can't beat the classics. orang01 These juvenile orangutans live at an animal center in Ketapang, West Kalimantan, in the Indonesian part of Borneo. Most of them were pets, taken from their parents while very young. orang05 They're on their way to school, where they'll learn the skills they need to survive in the wild, such as nest building, foraging, climbing and hiding. orang06 Twice a day the 80 orangutans make their way from their dormitory to the forest. Like a lot of kids, they're essentially lazy and don't want to walk so they're transported by wheelbarrows. orang03 The wheelbarrows let the staff move them from their night quarters into the forest much faster than if they had to carry or walk with the Orangutans. They can take as many as 11 in each load. orang02 Some of the orangutans enjoy the ride. Others look apprehensive, but still prefer it to walking. orang04 International Animal Rescue centre, located in Ketapang, West Kalimantan, goes through about 80 wheelbarrows a year. They tend to rust in the humid jungle and the wheels often break on the rough track. Lis Key, Spokesman for the International Animal Rescue, explains "The wheelbarrows don't last long on the bumpy tracks at the orangutan center and in the Indonesian humidity. So we're constantly appealing for more funds to buy new wheelbarrows. It's no fun pushing a barrow full of primates around with a flat tire, that's for sure." orang07 We're not sure we agree. It looks like it could be more fun than a barrel of monkeys.
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The Odd Couple

by on Jun.21, 2011, under Animals, Family, Nature

Suryia and Roscoe are an unlikely pair. They met four years ago when Roscoe followed staff from The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species (TIGERS) in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina as they walked home. Dr Bhagavan Antle, the reserve's founder, said, "Roscoe looked really thin and a little lost so we fed him and took care of him. He followed us through the gate and ran over and found Suryia. As soon as he saw Roscoe, Suryia ran over to him and they started playing." "Dogs are usually scared of primates, but they took to each other straight away. We made a few calls to see if he belonged to anyone and when no one came forward, Roscoe ended up staying."

Suryia, an orangutan, and Roscoe, a bluetick hound, are virtually inseparable.

They hang around together all day.

They even swim together.

Suryia isn't a great swimmer so he wears a life vest.

Suryia walks Roscoe around the compound.

Sometimes, after rolling around, going for a walk, or swimming, they ride Bubbles, the elephant.

They share almost everything. Roscoe doesn't like bananas.

Their popularity has soared since the book came out, and Suryia and Roscoe are on tour to promote it.

The book has lots of pictures of the pair, along with their story, and is available now.

Suryia And Roscoe, by Dr Antle, Thea Feldman and photographer Barry Bland

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