Dire News

Tag: indonesia

Branching Out

by on Aug.11, 2016, under Health, Nature

It's not unusual to anthropomorphize what we see in nature. pohon_mirip_manusia We know it's a tree, but we see human-like attributes.  Often it's facial features, which are easy for us to recognize. tree_butt But frequently it's something else. abul_bandar1 Abul Bandar, from Khulna, Bangladesh, suffers from Epidermodysplasia Verruciformis, an inherited skin disorder, which makes him appear to be turning into a tree. The lesions are a result of the recessive gene that makes him susceptible to cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas brought about by human papillomavirus (HPV). abul_bandar2 While the root of the problem is known, there is not yet a treatment for it, although the growths can be surgically pruned. The growths don't hurt or itch much, but the sickening odor makes it hard for other people to be around the sufferers. dede_kosawara1 While the condition is rare, it's been seen a number of times before. Pictured above is Dede Koswara, an Indonesian who was known as the original "Tree Man", being prepared for his ninth surgery.  After losing his family and job, he was able to find employment at a circus. A picture of him posted on the Internet caused a media frenzy that made the condition more famous. dede_kosawara2 Dede had 13 pounds of the lesions removed with an electric saw, and then chemotherapy was tried to bring the disease under control. The treatment was curtailed when his liver failed, and the lesions returned. He died of  liver, hepatitus, and gastric disorders at the age of 42 in January 2016. abul_bandar3
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Barrow of Monkeys

by on Jun.22, 2015, under Animals, Education, Nature

What's more fun than a barrel of puppies? puppies_barrel Philosopher Milton Bradley tells us it's a Barrel of Monkeys. monkeys_nofun02 When it comes down to it, you can't beat the classics. orang01 These juvenile orangutans live at an animal center in Ketapang, West Kalimantan, in the Indonesian part of Borneo. Most of them were pets, taken from their parents while very young. orang05 They're on their way to school, where they'll learn the skills they need to survive in the wild, such as nest building, foraging, climbing and hiding. orang06 Twice a day the 80 orangutans make their way from their dormitory to the forest. Like a lot of kids, they're essentially lazy and don't want to walk so they're transported by wheelbarrows. orang03 The wheelbarrows let the staff move them from their night quarters into the forest much faster than if they had to carry or walk with the Orangutans. They can take as many as 11 in each load. orang02 Some of the orangutans enjoy the ride. Others look apprehensive, but still prefer it to walking. orang04 International Animal Rescue centre, located in Ketapang, West Kalimantan, goes through about 80 wheelbarrows a year. They tend to rust in the humid jungle and the wheels often break on the rough track. Lis Key, Spokesman for the International Animal Rescue, explains "The wheelbarrows don't last long on the bumpy tracks at the orangutan center and in the Indonesian humidity. So we're constantly appealing for more funds to buy new wheelbarrows. It's no fun pushing a barrow full of primates around with a flat tire, that's for sure." orang07 We're not sure we agree. It looks like it could be more fun than a barrel of monkeys.
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